COVID-19 UPDATE – Our Legal Team is Fully Operational. Serving Existing Clients and Accepting New Cases.

Surgical errors in tummy tuck result in $1.3 million award

Regardless of whether an operation is necessary for health reasons or elective for personal reasons, there are risks involved and medical malpractice may occur. The malpractice may not be limited to just the surgery itself; it can also include the failure to monitor the patient after the surgery.

One woman recently underwent an abdominoplasty, more commonly known as a tummy tuck. She was close to 40 and in great shape, but she wanted to look better. But, the surgery resulted in her losing almost everything, including her business and her health.

The issues with the surgery started almost immediately. She was having drainage and clots and she reported her worsened condition to the surgeon who performed the surgery. The doctor cleaned the area and prescribed treatments, including pain medication, but the complications continued. The doctor eventually told her it was infected but reportedly never referred her to a wound care specialist. About eight weeks after the surgery, the woman went to the emergency room and was then referred to a wound care doctor who found that she had a staph infection. She was hospitalized for six days while the infection healed.

The woman took the doctor to court. The jury has now awarded her $1.3 million including compensation for lost income. The doctor’s attorneys say that they will file an appeal.

All physicians have a duty to meet the standard of care required by the medical profession. Patients who have suffered complications as a result of negligent medical treatment have a right to be compensated for their pain and suffering, as well as other damages they may suffer, such as lost income. A Pennsylvania attorney with experience in medical malpractice matters can help patients determine whether they have valid claims.

Source: The Jackson Citizen Patriot, “Jury awards Jackson woman $1.3 million in medical malpractice case,” Danielle Salisbury, Feb. 21, 2014