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Efforts to curb instances of misdiagnosis, failure to diagnose

Did you know that misdiagnosis cases are a leading cause of medical malpractice lawsuits in the US? The truth is that most people will experience a situation in which an error with their diagnosis impacts them in their lifetime. For some, these instances of misdiagnosis or a failure to diagnose will have devastating consequences. This is according to a report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

Because of this, those who have been patients at local Pennsylvania medical facilities should pay extra attention to the care that they receive. There are many ways a misdiagnosis or failure to diagnose could cause unnecessary injury to a patient. However, if one has been injured, or their medical condition worsens, they need to consider the possibility that they have been injured due to a misdiagnosis on behalf of a doctor or hospital error. Getting quality medical care is the number one priority.

The second priority would then be recovering financially for the mistakes or negligence of another party. There could be multiple parties behind a situation in which a patient is injured due to a misdiagnosis or failure to diagnose. The key is to, first and foremost, recognize that you have been wronged. Uncovering the “whos” and “hows” will unfold as one takes the appropriate investigative steps in the process.

In the meantime, steps are being taken in hopes of reducing the instances of misdiagnosis and failure to diagnose. This is because of the catastrophic effects they can have on people and their families. In theory, misdiagnosis and failure to diagnose is a very preventable problem. Doctors and hospital staff simply need to make the correct medical decision, a decision that is judged against one that their peers would have made, given that exact situation.

Source: wsj.com, “The Key to Reducing Doctors’ Misdiagnosis,” Laura Landro, September 12, 2017