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Posts tagged "medical malpractice"

Recognizing a hospital error can be a key to being compensated

Pennsylvania residents who need to have medical treatment are placing their trust in their doctor and the facility. It is unfortunate that there are instances when that trust is misplaced and there is a mistake. While many errors do not cause damage to the patient, there are others that can lead to a worsening of the condition, injury and death. The Centers for Disease Control states that as many as a quarter of a million people die due to medical errors annually. Medical facilities have certain steps they are taking to try and reduce this number. It is important for patients to be aware of who is most at risk and what the dangers are to keep an eye on potential mistakes that might have injured or killed a loved one.

Study indicates misdiagnosis of asthma is common

Pennsylvanians will often associate a dangerous misdiagnosis made by a medical professional with cancers, heart attacks, strokes and other life-threatening illnesses or conditions. Other medical problems can also be misdiagnosed and lead to the patient receiving the wrong treatment or medication that is not applicable to them. One such condition is asthma. A recent study indicates that as many as one in three adults who receive the diagnosis of having asthma might not have it.

What are the most common medical errors that could harm you?

Much discussion has been spread regarding medical mistakes and how they impact residents in Pennsylvania and other states across the nation. While it has been noted that fatal medical mistakes rank high when it comes to giving a number to the leading causes of death in the United States, it is more important to note how likely medical mistakes are and what are the likely types to impact patients in the U.S.

What to do if you suffered because of a medication error

When we go to the doctor or hospital, we as patients expect medical professionals to initiate a treatment plan. For most patients in Pennsylvania and elsewhere, this often means being prescribed a medication. While medications are available, it is possible that certain ones could result in a patient suffering a worsened condition. In addition, if a doctor makes a medication error and a patient is given the wrong dose or wrong medication, this could mean serious health issues or even death.

The reality of medical diagnostic errors

Going to the doctor is not always a big deal. Many people in Pennsylvania and elsewhere visit their primary physician each year for a yearly checkup. While preventative medicine focuses on certain healthcare areas, a patient should always be able to rely on their medical professional to diagnose and treat them whether it is during a yearly check-up or for ailments they are currently suffering. Failing to make a proper assessment can not only lead to a misdiagnosis or a missed diagnosis, but it can also mean delayed treatment and a worsened condition.

Possibility of computers helping doctors reduce misdiagnoses

It is an uncomfortable feeling -- knowing that there is something wrong with your health but fearful of knowing what it is. Residents in Pennsylvania and elsewhere rely on medical professionals to not only determine what is wrong with us but also to determine what the best course of treatment is. But a treatment plan is only as good as the diagnosis it is based off of, and when a doctor fails to properly diagnose a patient, he or she could suffer due to the wrong treatment plan and a delayed diagnosis.

Overworked medical residents could lead to medical mistakes

Individuals in Pennsylvania and elsewhere are aware that medical professionals are required to fulfill educational and residency experience before he or she is able to treat patients. While medical professionals go through years of education and on-hand experience, rigorous training and education do not always prevent medical errors. In fact, the structure for medical and surgical residents could be groundwork for medical mistakes.

Hospital Hides Surgical Error from Family

A cancer patient presented to the University Hospital Coventry in England to have her kidney removed as part of her cancer treatment; tragically, the mother of three passed away two days after the operation. The woman allegedly died due to a medical error in which the blood supply from two arteries was cut off, which was not supposed to be a part of the procedure. This fact was never reported to the woman's family. The family only learned of these allegations after BBC received an anonymous tip and informed the family. In addition, the hospital reportedly did not report any error to the coroner's office. The hospital wrote to the woman's family and apologized "for the distress that they have suffered." The hospital also said that the coroner was immediately notified of the death in a detailed report. The coroner's office, however, stated that "the hospital did not make the coroner aware of any surgical error at the time of death or subsequently until the matter was brought to the coroner's attention by solicitors for the family."

Surgeon Blamed for Removing Kidney from Wrong Patient

Health officials are investigating a complaint that a Massachusetts surgeon inadvertently removed a kidney from the wrong patient. The alleged error occurred at St. Vincent Hospital in Worcester, but the patient's physician, who was not affiliated with the hospital, scheduled the surgery and is most likely at fault. Officials connected with St. Vincent Hospital gave the following statement:

FDA Says Drug Causes Compulsive Gambling and Sex

A recent FDA report warns consumers of the dangers associated with Aripiprazole, a drug used to treat depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. The drug, which goes by the trade names Abilify, Abilify Maintena, and Aristada, can in some cases lead to irresistible urges to gamble, eat, shop, and have sex. Aripiprazole has been prescribed to more than 1.6 million patients over the last 13 years. As of May of 2016, 184 cases of Aripiprazole induced impulse problems had been reported to the FDA, but the agency believes a high number of cases go unreported. Of these 184 reported cases, 164 of them complained of impulsive gambling after consuming the drug. When these patients lowered their dosage or stopped taking Aripiprazole altogether, their impulse problems stopped. Unfortunately, many doctors initially believed that the increase in gambling was a valid reason to increase their patient's dosage of Aripiprazole, making the behavior worse. Read more about the problems associate with Aripiprazole.

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